Submissions

Online Submissions

Already have a Username/Password for Journal of Comorbidity?
Go to Login

Need a Username/Password?
Go to Registration

Registration and login are required to submit items online and to check the status of current submissions.

 

Author Guidelines

These guidelines comply with those formulated by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors. For further details, authors should consult the Uniform requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

SCOPE 

The Journal of Comorbidity (JOC) is an international, open-access, multidisciplinary, peer-reviewed journal that publishes original clinical and experimental research articles on the pathophysiology, prevention, diagnosis and management of comorbidity/multimorbidity.

JOC aims to serve as a platform for an exchange of ideas and working principles/practices of clinical management within a multi-therapy framework. In addition to original papers, the journal publishes guidelines, policies, editorials, commentaries, protocols, and critical review articles, as well as proceedings of congresses. The journal encourages the submission of articles that optimize the clinical management of patients. The Editorial Board also welcomes ideas and suggestions for special issues dedicated to unique themes.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

PUBLICATION FEE

The publication of an article in JOC incurs a processing fee of EUR 950 per article (excl. VAT) of up to seven typeset pages (A4). For each additional typeset page a charge of EUR 50 is incurred. It is customary that the author's institution covers the publication costs for articles resulting from research undertaken at the institution, or that money has been earmarked in the grant or stipend that the author has received to be able to carry out the research.

Publication fees may be waived for authors from developing countries lacking sufficient research funding, according to the World Bank classification of low- and middle-income countries as of January 2016. Individual waiver requests will be considered on a case-by-case basis and may be granted in circumstances of lack of funds. The ability of authors to pay remains unknown to the Editors prior to possible acceptance. Commentaries and editorials do not incur an article publication fee.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

POINTS TO CONSIDER BEFORE PUBLICATION 

An article is accepted for review by JOC on the understanding that:

  • It is written in clear, grammatical English
  • The content falls within the scope of the journal
  • It has not been published (in print or electronically, including on a website), in whole or in part
  • It has not been submitted or accepted for publication elsewhere
  • All named authors have agreed to submit the article to JOC in its present form
  • All relevant information (authorship, conflict of interest, permission to reproduce material, patient consent, ethics approval) has been supplied as requested.

JOC is a member of CrossCheck by CrossRef and iThenticate. iThenticate is a plagiarism screening service that verifies the originality of content by comparing the text with over 40 million published research articles and over 50 billion web pages. All articles submitted to JOC will be screened using iThenticate before publication.  

______________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

GENERAL

Please use a 12-point font, double-spacing; using italics, rather than underlining (except with URL addresses).

______________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

LANGUAGE

All articles should be written in English – British or American English is acceptable as long as consistency is observed.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

ABBREVIATIONS

The use of abbreviations should be kept to a minimum. All abbreviations must be defined in parentheses after their first occurrence, both in the text and tables/figures.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

NOMENCLATURE

We strongly recommend the use of System International (SI) units. If you do not use these units exclusively, please provide the SI value in parentheses after each value. All species names, genes, mutations, genotypes and alleles should be italicized.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

AUTHORSHIP

It is the responsibility of the corresponding author to ensure that all authors are aware of, and approve, the submission of the article, its content, authorship and order of authorship. A signed statement that all named authors have agreed to the submission and have participated in the study/report to a sufficient extent to be named as authors should accompany submitted manuscripts. Contributions of individual coauthors involved in the preparation of the article should be clearly stated in the cover letter. If the authorship of a paper is changed in any way after it has been reviewed, the Editor will require a letter, signed by all authors named on the original or on the revised submission, explicitly agreeing to the change. The Editors reserve the right to make literary corrections.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

STATISTICS VALIDITY

If complicated statistical data are provided, the authors may be requested to submit a statement issued by a certified statistician regarding the validity of the methods used.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

Authors must state all possible conflicts of interest, including financial, consultant, institutional and other relationships that might lead to bias or a conflict of interest. If there is no conflict of interest, this should be explicitly stated. All sources of funding should be acknowledged in the article. Upon acceptance, authors will be required to complete an ICMJE Conflicts of Interest form, which can be downloaded here.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

PERMISSION TO REPRODUCE MATERIAL

Authors should include with their submission copies of written permission to reproduce materials published elsewhere (such as figures, tables, etc.) from the copyright holder. Authors are responsible for paying any associated fees to reproduce the material.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

HUMAN AND ANIMAL RIGHTS

If the work involves the use of human subjects, the author(s) should ensure that the work described has been performed in accordance with The Code of Ethics of the World Medical Association (Declaration of Helsinki) for experiments involving humans. Authors should include a statement in the manuscript that informed consent was obtained for experimentation with human subjects.

Human subjects have a right to privacy that should not be infringed without informed consent. Identifying details (written or photographic) should be omitted if they are not essential, but patient data should never be altered or falsified in an attempt to attain anonymity. Complete anonymity is difficult to achieve, and a consent form should be obtained if there is any doubt. For example, masking the eye region in photographs of patients is inadequate protection of anonymity. 

All animal experiments should comply with the ARRIVE guidelines and the authors should clearly indicate in the manuscript that such guidelines have been followed.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

INFORMED CONSENT

Investigations on human subjects must include a statement indicating that informed consent was obtained.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

ANIMAL WELFARE

Investigations with experimental animals must include a statement that their care was in accordance with institutional guidelines.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

COVER LETTER

A covering letter should be included as a separate document to the article indicating:

  1. That the article is being submitted for consideration for publication in JOC
  2. The address, email and telephone details of the primary correspondence
  3. That the submitted article is original work and has not been, nor will be, submitted for publication elsewhere (with the exception of conference abstracts/poster presentations)
  4. Contributions of individual coauthors involved in the preparation of the article
  5. Why this article is suitable for publication in JOC
  6. How your article provides a worthwhile addition to the scientific literature
  7. How your article relates to previously published work
  8. Which types of scientists you believe will be most interested in your study
  9. Recommendations for faculty or professional reviewers to expedite the review process (please be aware that the reviewers will be required to sign a statement of disclosure indicating any potential conflicts of interest in reviewing the article). You may recommend up to 4 reviewers, but we cannot guarantee that they will be used. You may also note any reviewers who you do not wish to referee your paper.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

SUBMISSIONS

Manuscripts should be submitted online by one of the authors of the article. Text files should be submitted as a formatted Word (DOC, DOCX, RTF) files. Graphics files can only be submitted in the following formats: EPS, TIFF, JPEG, PNG, DOC, PPT or PDF. There is no page limit. Only online submissions are accepted to facilitate rapid publication and minimize administrative costs. Submissions by anyone other than one of the authors will not be accepted. The submitting author takes responsibility for the paper during submission and peer review.

If you experience difficulties with the manuscript submission Web site or are concerned about the suitability of your files, please contact the submissions department: submissions@jcomorbidity.com or publisher: info@swissmedicalpress.com.

Please note that JOC operates an open peer-review process in that the authors’ and reviewers’ identities are known to each other. The identities of the reviewers are not published, nor are the reviewer evaluations or author responses.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

ORGANIZATION OF THE ARTICLE

Where possible, the article should be clearly structured with appropriate sections including:

  • Introduction
  • Present investigation (Objectives, Materials and Methods, Results)
  • Discussion/Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • Conflicts of interest
  • Funding
  • References.

For longer articles, consider including subheadings for easier reading. Refer to the section below for specific article types and submission criteria.

Begin each section, including figure and table legends, on separate pages; insert running page numbers.

 

Title page

The title page should constitute the first page of the article and include the following:

  1. Title of article
  2. Name of author(s); including first, middle and last names
  3. Name of department(s) and institution(s), including city, state/province (if applicable) and country for all authors
  4. Name and full postal and email address of the corresponding author, who also acts as 'Guarantor' for all parts of the paper. 

The title should be informative and accurate, conveying the message of the paper and generating interest of the reader. A brief title, of not more than 40 characters including spaces, will be used as the running head to appear on each page of the article.


Abstract

The second page of the article should contain an abstract not exceeding 250 words. It should provide sufficient information for the reader to be able to decide whether or not to read the full article. The abstract should be structured in the following way: Background, Objective, Design, Results, Conclusions. Review articles should contain an unstructured abstract. No references should be cited in the abstract. The abstract should be followed by a list of 5–10 keywords, which will assist in cross-indexing the article. Where possible, the terms used should be from the Medical Subject headings list of the Index Medicus.

 

Section headings

Please do not number section headings. Use a maximum of three levels of headings, made clear by orthographic indicators, i.e. 14-point font, bold, italics etc.

 

Introduction

Briefly describe the pertinent background information and references that inform the reader as to why you undertook your study. Brevity and focus are important.

 

Objectives

The hypothesis or aim of your study should be clearly stated.

 

Materials and Methods

Consider using appropriate subheadings. The study design should be described. For clinical trials, the registry information should be included (see section on Article Categories, 'Original articles'). For randomized controlled trials, authors are requested to include the CONSORT flow diagram (http://www.consort-statement.org/home/).

For human studies, it is essential to state whether or not ethical clearance and patient informed consent were obtained. This applies for both prospective and retrospective studies. In the case of animal experiments, a statement regarding approval by the local ethics committee and/or in accordance with the Helsinki Declaration of 1975, as revised in 2008, should be made. The number and selection of the subjects studied (patients or experimental animals, including controls) must be clearly stated. Information on subject characteristics of groups being compared should be given for any factors that could potentially bias the comparison of the groups; such information is often best presented in a tabular format in which the groups are in adjacent columns. In the event of the study being randomized, details of the randomization procedure should be included. The methods, instrumentation (trade names and manufacturer's name and location in parentheses), and procedures must be identified in sufficient detail to allow other workers to reproduce the study. Provide references to established methods, including statistical methods that have been published but are not well known; describe new or substantially modified methods. Briefly state the statistical methods used to analyse your data. It is strongly recommended that all authors seek statistical consultation prior to planning a study to ensure that collection of data and the statistical tests to analyse those data are appropriate. If complicated statistical data are provided, the authors may be requested to submit a statement issued by a certified statistician regarding the validity of the methods used.

 

Results

Results should be presented in a clear and logical sequence. Any exclusions or losses to follow-up that might affect the study population are required to be stated. When tables are used, do not duplicate tabular data in the text, but do describe important trends and points. Summarize only important observations, and do not repeat in the text all the data in the tables and/or artwork. Ensure that all items mentioned in the 'Materials and Methods' section have been evaluated and addressed. State the statistical significance of your findings. Numerators and denominators must be provided either in the text or the tables for all percentages given. The same applies to sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive- and negative-predictive values. When using subheadings in the 'Materials and Methods' section, it might be helpful to present the results in the same sequence using the same subheadings.

 

Discussion/Conclusions

Emphasize the advances in knowledge provided by your study and the conclusions that can be drawn. Detailed data given in the results section should not be repeated unless it is used to compare with the results of other studies. The implications of the findings as well as their limitations should be discussed. Link the conclusions with the objectives of your study; but unqualified statements and conclusions not supported entirely by the data should be avoided. It is advised to avoid reporting on the results of any ongoing investigations that are not yet completed. Potential future practical applications should be discussed when related to experimental studies, animal or otherwise.

 

Acknowledgements

Acknowledgements should only be given to those people who have made a substantial contribution to the study.

 

Conflicts of interest

Authors must state all possible conflicts of interest, including financial, consultant, institutional and other relationships that might lead to bias or a conflict of interest. If there is no conflict of interest, this should be explicitly stated.

 

Funding

All sources of funding should be acknowledged. If there is no funding, this should be explicitly stated.

 

References

Authors are responsible for the accuracy of the references cited within the article. Cite only those references that are closely related to the work and avoid exhaustive lists. All references must appear in the text and the reference list. References should be numbered consecutively in the order in which they first appear in the text. They should be assigned Arabic numerals, which should be given in square brackets, e.g. [17]. Within the brackets, commas separate numerals, and three or more consecutive references are given as ranges, e.g. [1,2,5,23–27,33]. Do not use any type of reference manager software (e.g. Endnote, Reference Manager) to generate the reference list.

References should include the names of all authors when there are six or fewer; when there are seven or more authors, list only the first six names and add et al. References should also include full title and source information. Journal names should be abbreviated as in Index Medicus

Where available, Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) should be included in full. Articles in press may be included in the list of references. Abstracts and/or articles presented at meetings not in the public domain should be avoided. Information from articles that have not yet been accepted for publication should be cited in the text as 'unpublished observation(s)' or 'personal communication' and not included in the reference list.

 

Journals

Up to six authors

  • Smith SM, Soubhi H, Fortin M, Hudon C, O’Dowd T. Managing patients with multimorbidity: systematic review of interventions in primary care and community settings. BMJ 2012;345:e5205. http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.e5205
  • Treadwell J. Coping with complexity: working beyond the guidelines for patients with multimorbidities. J Comorbidity 2015;5(1):11–14. 


Seven or more authors

  • Schaink AK, Kuluski K, Lyons RF, Fortin M, Jadad A, Upshur RE, et al. A scoping review and thematic classification of patient complexity: offering a unifying framework. J Comorbidity 2012;2(1):1–9. http://dx.doi.org/10.15256/joc.2016.6.63

  

Supplements

  • Roth T. Comorbid insomnia: current directions and future challenges. Am J Manag Care 2009;15(Suppl):S6–13.

 

Meeting abstracts

  • Mauser-Bunschoten E, Roosendaal G, Schutgens R, Fischer K. Comorbidity in the aging haemophilia patient. Haemophilia 2008;14(Suppl 3):128 [Abstract 22 PO 07].
  • Salanitro AH, Funkhouser E, Allison JJ, Halanych JH, Litaker MS, Levine DA, et al. Multiple uncontrolled comorbid conditions and medication intensification. Presented at: Southern Regional Meeting of the American Federation for Medical Research; 2009 Feb 9–14; New Orleans, LA, USA [Abstract 439].

 

Epub ahead of print

  • Taua C, Hepworth J, Neville C. Nurses’ role in caring for people with a comorbidity of mental illness and intellectual disability: A literature review. Int J Ment Health Nurs 2011 [Epub ahead of print].

 

Books

Complete book

  • Brown T. ADHD comorbidities: handbook for ADHD complications in children and adults. Arlington: American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc.; 2008.
  • National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK). Depression: the treatment and management of depression in adults (updated edition). Leicester, UK: The British Psychological Society and the Royal College of Psychiatrists; 2010. Available from:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK63748/ [Last accessed May 10, 2016]. 


Chapter in book

  • Ziedonis D, Steinberg ML, D'Avanzo, Smelson D. Co-occurring schizophrenia and addiction. In: Kranzler HR, Tinsley JA, editors. Dual diagnosis and psychiatric treatment: substance abuse and comorbid disorders. 2nd Ed. New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc.; 2004. pp. 320–59.
  • Stewart M, Fortin M. Multimorbidity and patient-centred care. In: Mercer SW, Salisbury C, Fortin M, editors. ABC of multimorbidity. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd; 2014. pp. 22–5.

Websites

  • National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. NICE clinical guidelines 181. Lipid modification: cardiovascular risk assessment and the modification of blood lipids for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Manchester: NICE; 2014. Available from: http://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg181 [Last accessed Jan 12, 2015].
  • International Research Community on Multimorbidity. Available from: http://crmcspl-blog.recherche.usherbrooke.ca [Last accessed Mar 13, 2016].

______________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

ARTICLE CATEGORIES

Original article

JOC considers all types of original articles specifically addressing comorbidity. These articles include studies such as randomized trials, interventional studies, cohort studies, case-control studies, observational studies, surveys or epidemiological studies. Original articles report on clinical and experimental studies that have not previously been published or submitted elsewhere for publication. Relevant sections, as described in 'Organization of the article', should be considered.

For clinical trials, authors are requested to include the trial registry name, registration identification number and URL of the registry. For randomized controlled trials, the CONSORT flow diagram (http://www.consort-statement.org/home/) and trial identifier, such as ClinicalTrials.gov registration identifier (http://www.clinicaltrial.gov/) should be included. The CONSORT checklist (http://www.consort-statement.org/home/) should also be completed and submitted with the article. Trial details should be provided at the end of the abstract as well as when you first mention the trial in the article.

....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 

Review article

These articles are critical assessments of the current literature and/or data sources pertaining to clinical topics, with an emphasis on pathophysiology, diagnosis, prognosis, prevention and management. An abstract not exceeding 250 words is required, but does not need to be structured. Criteria for the review will include comprehensiveness, balance and importance of information, and level of interest to readers of JOC. All articles will be peer reviewed.

....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 

Study protocol

The Journal of Comorbidity believes that publishing study protocols serves several important purposes: it increases research quality and transparency, encourages communication and collaboration between research teams, helps to disseminate contemporary ideas about study design and data analysis, avoids research duplication, and may assist study recruitment.

The availability of a published final protocol allows subsequent authors and reviewers to cross-reference the study details, assists in presenting the final results, aids systematic evaluation of the data, and discourages reporting bias. Importantly, it enables readers to compare the original aims and design of the study with the final reported outcomes, thereby reducing the potential for unexplained post-hoc revisions of the study goals and methodologies – a problem that appears to affect the reporting of both observational studies and randomized controlled trials.

Study protocols will usually be published in the Journal of Comorbidity without peer review if the study has received approval from an institutional review board (IRB)/ethics committee and has received peer-reviewed grant support from a major extramural funding body – evidence of both will be required and we recommend authors to provide the relevant documentation on submission. Study protocols without ethics approval or funding will be peer reviewed. Authors are not required to submit subsequent reports of their study to the journal; however, the editors encourage the authors to consider doing so.

 

Types of protocols

Protocols that describe the design of planned or ongoing research will be considered for publication in the Journal of Comorbidity. Protocols for any study design will be considered, including observational, qualitative, exploratory studies, experimental studies, and systematic reviews. The submission of protocols for studies that will evaluate specific aspects of clinical trial design are encouraged.

 

General protocol guidelines

The Journal of Comorbidity endorses the SPIRIT (Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials) Statement, which provides important guidance on drafting protocols, and the PRISMA-P (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines, which provide a 17-item checklist for preparing systematic review and meta-analysis protocols. Authors are encouraged to follow these guidelines, where appropriate, when preparing their protocol, with specific attention being paid to the challenges of comorbidity/multimorbidity research. More detailed explanation on how to use the PRISMA-P guidance can be found here.

Study protocols should provide a comprehensive overview of all aspects of the study conduct and contain a summary of the roles and responsibilities, the rationale and study objectives, a full description of the study design/methodology, including study settings, sample size, eligibility criteria, interventions and timelines, data collection and statistical methodologies, data monitoring, dissemination policies, and analysis of the proposed research. 

For studies investigating issues relating to comorbidity/multimorbidity, protocols should clearly define the comorbid or multimorbid conditions under investigation and outline any restrictions based on predetermined lists of conditions; they should explain how any proposed interventions will address these conditions, and they should outline how the study will overcome issues relating to generalizability and/or external validity that can complicate comorbidity/multimorbidity studies. When developing a protocol for a cohort study, ideally using a prospective design, consideration should be given to how the study might enhance understanding of the natural history and trajectory of the comorbid/multimorbid conditions, illness and treatment burden, patient quality of life and well-being, as well as the quality, safety, and cost-effectiveness of care.

 

Preparing the protocol

The outline of the protocol should follow the general author guidelines for preparing an article for publication, with the following variations:

 

Organization of the article

Where applicable, the protocol should be clearly structured with appropriate sections, such as:

  • Objective(s)
  • Methods/Design and Analysis
  • Discussion/Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • Conflicts of interest
  • Funding
  • References.


Abstract

The abstract should be structured, if applicable, with the following sections: Background, Objective, Design, Results, Conclusions.

 

Introduction/Background

Describe the current setting that is the basis for the proposed research, including an outline of the problem (with references) and a review of current literature. Include a critical evaluation of current knowledge and preliminary studies related to the proposed research and describe how the proposal will enhance this knowledge. Describe the purpose of the study, including any specific primary or secondary objectives/hypotheses as appropriate.

 

Methods/Design and Analysis

Study protocols should be presented with sufficient detail to enable replication of the methods by others. The following information should be included where applicable:

  • Description of study design
  • Description of study population/framework and/or development of research proposal/questions
  • Description of sample selection/data collection
  • Clear description of all interventions and comparisons
  • Sample size determination and power analyses, if appropriate
  • Study outcomes/endpoints – when and how measured
  • Data analysis plan
  • Ethics approval and dissemination: ethics approval, and safety considerations, where applicable, should be outlined, and any plans for dissemination of findings should be included.

 

Discussion/Conclusion

The following information can be considered for inclusion:

  • Any practical/operational issues or other challenges involved in performing the study
  • The importance/benefits of the study
  • How the proposed study will fill any evidence gaps
  • Future directions.

.......................................................................................................................................................................................................

Editorial 

The author may address virtually any important topic that is of interest to JOC readers and within the scope of the journal. Editorials should be focussed and clearly presented. The author may express his or her opinion without complete documentation. A maximum length of 1,500 words (not including references, figures, tables) and generally not more than three authors and three tables and/or figures is recommended. They should be double-spaced and include the names and affiliations of all authors, and the e-mail address of the corresponding author.

....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 

Commentary

The author may comment on/discuss a recent JOC article to express his or her opinions, views and perspectives. The commentary should be received within 4 weeks of the article's publication. They should not exceed 500 words of text, five references, three authors and one table and/or figure. They should be double-spaced and include the names and affiliations of all authors, and the e-mail address of the corresponding author. Commentaries should not duplicate other published material or include unpublished data. Commentaries will be published at the discretion of the editors and are subject to editing for content and style.

....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 

Policy

Policy papers should describe and analyse issues relating to health policy that are relevant to patients with comorbidity/multimorbidity. Policy papers are aimed at all professionals, decision-makers, health policy researchers and legislators concerned with developing, analysing and implementing health policy at local, national, and international levels. Policies are intended to enhance discussion, to guide decision-making, and to be adapted according to specific needs.

 

Preparing the policy

Policy papers should follow the general author guidelines for preparing an article for publication where applicable, and consider the following:

  • Describe the current setting that is the basis for the policy
  • Provide a clear goal of the policy
  • Describe what is happening, and where, how and why
  • Describe who is involved and what their thoughts and/or roles in the policy development are
  • What are the expected/intended outcomes of the policy on the health system in terms of access, population benefit, cost/economics, ethics/equity, and feasibility?

The structure of the policy will depend on several factors, such as whether the policy is in development, has just been passed/implemented, is being updated, or is an evaluation/review.

A suggested structure for preparing your policy is provided below. Not all sections will be appropriate for all papers, and other aspects may also be considered appropriate:

  • Abstract
  • Introduction (including policy statement)
  • Methods/Design (including description of the policy development)
  • Results
  • Discussion (including impact on stakeholders, policy advocacy, policy implementation, improvement and evaluation)
  • Conclusion (including future directions)
  • Acknowledgements
  • Conflicts of interest
  • Funding
  • References

Authors should prepare their policy using a simple, clear and non-technical language where possible. Highly technical figures/tables/images should also be avoided, or placed in a supplementary file.  

....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 

Treatment guidelines

Treatment guidelines should be prepared based on expert consensus from key societies, panels, committees or working groups. The guidelines are intended as a practical guide to the management of patients with comorbidity, and represent a synthesis of current medical knowledge and rational clinical practice. Prospective authors should first consult the journal editor and provide a short summary of the area they propose to cover as well as the members of the consensus group and their expertise.

Authors should follow the relevant EQAUATOR Network reporting guidelines depending on the type of study. For example, for randomized controlled trials, the CONSORT flow diagram (http://www.consort-statement.org/home/) and trial identifier, such as ClinicalTrials.gov registration identifier (http://www.clinicaltrial.gov/) should be included. The CONSORT checklist (http://www.consort-statement.org/home/) should also be completed and submitted with the article. Trial details should be provided at the end of the abstract as well as when you first mention the trial in the article.

....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 

Proceedings of a congress

The editors of JOC will consider publishing proceedings of congresses if they meet the following requirements:

  • All content is unbiased and of educational value
  • Articles should be original work or reviews of previous studies
  • Any potential profitability of the proceedings must not influence the decision process – the editors will accept or reject a proceedings purely on academic merit
  • Any competing interests and financial support must be declared
  • Editors should be alert to series of articles advocating the use of one particular drug or formulation, particularly where the sponsor may have an interest – this type of promotional material will not be accepted
  • Articles must be prepared in accordance with the journal's instructions to authors
  • Acknowledgement of any commercial sponsorship will be confined to a line on the title page, introduction/editorial or webpage where online material appears.

....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 

Special articles

The editors of JOC will consider publishing ‘special articles’ that may not conform to the journal’s main formats but which fit within the scope of the journal and are of special interest to the readership. Authors wishing to contribute a ‘special article’ are advised to submit a presubmission enquiry to the journal editors: editorial@jcomorbidity.com or info@jcomorbidity.com

______________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

GUIDELINES FOR PREPARING TABLES, FIGURES, AND SUPPLEMENTARY FILES

Tables

All tables should be referred to specifically in the text of the article and placed on separate pages in the main manuscript file following the references. Tables should NOT be submitted as separate files. Repetition of material from the text should be avoided. Tables should be numbered consecutively using Arabic numerals (Table 1, Table 2, etc.) in the order in which they appear in the text. There should be a short descriptive title after the table number. All columns and rows should be properly aligned with appropriate space between rows and columns. Include horizontal rules at the top and bottom of a table and one below the column headings. If a column heading encompasses two or more subheadings, then the main headings and subheadings should be separated by a single short rule. No other rules should be included, neither horizontal nor vertical. Footnotes may used if necessary provided that they are referred to within the table by superscript letters. Begin each footnote on a new line. To allow faster review, all abbreviations in tables should be defined in footnotes even if defined in the text or a previous table. If you use data from another published or unpublished source, obtain permission and acknowledge the source fully.

.......................................................................................................................................................................................................

Figures

General

Authors are encouraged to submit figures in black and white, and in colour, where required for clarity of the argument. To avoid delays in publication, the following guidelines must be observed when preparing your article:

  • Figures should be provided as separate files, not embedded in the main manuscript file
  • Each figure should be submitted as a single, separate file named 'Figure 1', 'Figure 2', etc
  • Authors' names and affiliations should not appear anywhere on the figures
  • Patient identification must be obscured
  • Multi-panel figures (a, b, c, d etc.) should be submitted as a single composite file that contains all parts of the figure
  • Figures should be numbered in the order they are first mentioned in the text, and uploaded in this order
  • Figures should be uploaded in the correct orientation
  • Figure titles and legends should be provided in the main manuscript, not in the graphic file
  • Figure keys should be incorporated into the graphic, not into the legend of the figure
  • Each figure should be closely cropped to minimize the amount of white space surrounding the illustration. Information on individual figure file formats can be found below
  • No box should be placed around graphs, diagrams or other artwork
  • Background gridlines should be avoided unless they are essential (e.g. confidence limits)
  • All units of measurement must be shown on axes
  • All lines (e.g. graph axes) should have a minimum width of 1 pt weight
  • Avoid using tints (solid black and white or variations of crosshatching are preferred), but any tints that are used must be at a minimum 5% level (but do not use too high a tint as it may appear too dark)
  • Do not use three-dimensional histograms when the addition of a third dimension provides no further information
  • Individual figure files should not exceed 10 MB, which is adequate for extremely high quality figures
  • JOC does not redraw author-provided figures. It is the author's responsibility to ensure that figures are provided at a sufficiently high resolution to ensure high quality reproduction in the final article
  • Please note that it is the responsibility of the author(s) to obtain permission from the copyright holder to reproduce figures (or tables) that have previously been published elsewhere in non-Open Access journals. Permission should be indicated in the figure legend.

 

Charts and graphs

Chart and graphs are best submitted as a vector format figure as this allows a sharper reproduction of line and text elements.

  • Supported vector file formats are PDF, EPS, DOC and PPT
  • If you are submitting a graph or chart produced in Microsoft Excel, we recommend that you either save the chart as a PDF or copy the chart into a new Microsoft Word file and save it according to the instructions for DOC files
  • If your figure contains a key, please include this within the figure
  • Figure titles should not be included within the image file
  • Please avoid hatching or patterns and instead use shading or colours
  • The amount of white space around the illustration should be kept to a minimum - a 2-point, white space border around each figure is recommended
  • Annotations, e.g. arrows, should be used to indicate subtle but salient points
  • All annotations should be included within the images supplied
  • Please ensure axis labels will be legible at the anticipated size of the figure.

 

Photographs and scans

Figures that contain only photographic data are best submitted in a bitmap format such as JPEG, TIFF or PNG.

  • Many photographic images are captured as JPEG images, in which case they should be submitted as JPEGs. When capturing the image, be sure to use the maximum quality setting for JPEG quality, to avoid visible artefacts
  • The maximum effective resolution and quality of an image is determined when the original image is created (when the photograph is taken in the case of digital photography, or when an image is scanned). Increasing the resolution subsequent to this, whilst maintaining the same image size, is not advisable as it does not improve the quality of the image: the effective resolution remains the same
  • Similarly, resaving with higher quality JPEG compression settings will not compensate if the image was originally captured with low quality JPEG compression.
  • Final resolution of photographs should be a minimum of 300 dpi, when scaled to single or double column width
  • Photographs should be provided with a scale bar if appropriate.

 

If the photograph needs to include text, arrows or other explanatory elements, these can be added in a graphics programme, or these elements can be overlaid in Microsoft Word or PowerPoint, and the figure submitted in that format instead.

  • Copy the photographic image into a new file in the chosen editing programme
  • Add all explanatory elements
  • Once the image has been edited, save and submit the final file as EPS, PDF, DOC or PPT depending on the programme that was used to add the text. Do not reconvert to TIFF, JPEG or PNG as this will result in loss of quality.

 

Micrographs

Micrographs should be treated like photographs with the following additional guidelines.

  • Details of the magnification should be given
  • Details of any stains used and the method of preparing the sample should be given in the figure legend or in the Methods section
  • Detailed information about the microscope used should be included in the figure legend or in the Methods section
  • The type of camera, photographic software and details of any subsequent image manipulation should be given in the article text.

 

Medical X-rays

Medical X-rays should be treated like photographs. If it is necessary to obscure a patient identity in a photograph or X-ray, please do not use an overlay. Instead, edit the image itself using a graphics programme, such as Adobe Photoshop.

 

Screenshots

  • Screenshots are best saved as TIFF or PNG. Avoid JPEG as the compression will reduce the quality of the screenshot image
  • Screenshots should be submitted at the same resolution at which they are captured (e.g. 1024x768)
  • Similarly, do not convert screenshots to EPS format as this results in a larger file size without increase in quality.

 

Manipulations or enhancements

Image files should not be manipulated or enhanced in any way that could lead to misinterpretation of the information present in the original image. Any manipulations or enhancements of the images beyond grey-scaling should be clearly stated. If an image has been enhanced electronically, explain the alterations that have been made and send an original image along with the enhanced one. Images to be combined into one array, such as posterior-anterior and lateral views, should be sized the same to facilitate reproduction. When several images of a given type (e.g., CT, MR, US) are being shown, please reproduce each specific type at the same magnification. Images should correspond in appearance to the tonal relations of the original radiograph (i.e., showing the bones white on a dark background, with the patient's right to the observer's left, CT scans and MR images should employ the 'view from below').

 

File types

Image files must only be supplied as high-resolution EPS, TIFF, JPEG, PNG, DOC, PPT or PDF format. All other formats will not be accepted. EPS is preferred for drawn artwork (line drawings and graphs) and should be submitted with a preview file along with all the fonts attached. TIFF is preferred for halftones, or grey scale images i.e. medical images such as radiographs, MR scans, etc. For JPEG files, it is essential to save at maximum quality, i.e. '10', to ensure that image quality is satisfactory when the files are eventually decompressed.

 

Size and resolution

Illustrations should be designed such that all information is legible at the expected final dimension. JOC does not redraw author-provided figures. It is the author's responsibility to ensure that figures are provided at a sufficiently high resolution to ensure high quality reproduction in the final article.

  • Colour figure/illustration min 300 dpi
  • Greyscale min 600 dpi
  • Line artwork min 1200 dpi.

 

Legends for artwork

Each figure should have a detailed but concise legend listed on a separate page at the end of the main manuscript file, following the references:

  • Figure number (in sequence, using Arabic numerals - i.e. Figure 1, 2, 3 etc.)
  • Short title of figure
  • Detailed legend (optional).

 

Legends should not be incorporated into the graphic. The use of any abbreviations used in figures should also be clearly defined in the legend, whether or not they have been defined in the text of the article or in previous figures.

 

File compression

Figures submitted to JOC should be submitted with as small a file size as possible. Individual figure files should not exceed 10 MB. This reduces the time taken to upload files during submission and for referees and readers to download the complete article. Depending on the types of figure, the following guidelines should be considered. Further details can be found in the section on 'File types'.

 

Vector figures should, if possible, be submitted as PDF files, which are usually more compact than EPS files.

  • TIFF files should be saved with LZW compression, which decreases the file size without decreasing the quality, in order to minimize upload time
  • JPEG files should be saved at Maximum quality
  • Conversion of images between file types (especially lossy formats such as JPEG) should be kept to a minimum to avoid degradation of quality.

 

Units of measurement

Measurements of length, height, weight, and volume should be reported in metric units (metre, kilogram, or litre) or their decimal multiples. Temperatures should be given in degrees Celsius. Blood pressure should be given in millimetres of mercury. 

All haematological and clinical chemistry measurements should be reported in the metric system in terms of the International System of Units (SI). 

Editors may request that alternative or non-SI units be added by the authors before publication.

 

Creative commons attribution license

All work will be published under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License (CC BY-NC 4.0), which permits readers to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts, provided the original work is appropriately credited, and include a link to the license, and indicate if any changes were made. In cases of reuse, copy or distribution for commercial purposes, permission from the publisher is required.

Any submitted artwork that is subject to copyright must be accompanied by written permission from the copyright holder allowing reproduction.

 

.......................................................................................................................................................................................................

Supplementary files

Data sets, extended tables, movie files, or other information are welcome as an optional source of information. These files can be uploaded in the 'Supplementary files' area during the manuscript submission process.

Supplementary Files can be uploaded in any file format and will be made available to readers in their original format. These files are also indexed, identifying their relation to the submission as well as their ownership. They may include (a) research instruments, (b) data sets, (c) sources that otherwise would be unavailable to readers, or (d) large figures or extended tables or protocols that cannot be integrated into the text itself.

Additional data files should be referenced explicitly within the body of the article, e.g. 'See Supplementary Figure 1', 'See Supplementary Methods', or '(Supplementary Table)', etc.

 

Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.

  1. All named authors have agreed to submit the article to the Journal of Comorbidity in its present form and authorize the corresponding author to be the point of contact throughout the peer review and proofreading process.
  2. The work is original and has not been submitted, considered, or accepted for publication, or published, elsewhere (excluding abstract/poster form).

  3. The submission does not contain anything obscene, indecent, objectional or libellous according to generally accepted norms.

  4. All requested information (authorship, conflict of interest, permission to reproduce material, patient consent, ethics approval, funding etc.) has been supplied where applicable, as outlined in the Author Guidelines.

  5. The text adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the Author Guidelines.

  6. The submission file is in Word doc, docx or rtf; is double-spaced; uses a 12-point font; employs italics, rather than underlining (except with URL addresses); and includes running page numbers.
  7. The cover letter contains all requested information, including up to 4 potential reviewers, as outlined in the Author Guidelines.

  8. I, the corresponding author, warrant that my co-authors and I shall indemnify and hold harmless Swiss Medical Press GmbH as to warranties and representations of the author's ownership, originality, or similar breaches. Such indemnification shall last beyond publication of the article, as well as extend to all related claims.
 

Copyright Notice

Open Access authors retain the copyright of their papers, and all open access articles are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License (CC BY-NC 4.0). Articles are therefore free for everyone to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts, provided the original work is appropriately credited, and include a link to the license, and indicate if any changes were made. In cases of reuse, copy or distribution for commercial purposes, permission from the publisher is required.

Authors retain copyright of their work, with first publication rights granted to the Publisher. However, authors are required to transfer copyrights associated with commercial use to the Publisher. Revenues from commercial sales are used to keep the publication fees down. Moreover, a major portion of the profits generated from commercial sales is placed into a fund to cover publication fees for researchers from developing nations and, in some cases, for young researchers.

Any questions about whether a particular use is authorized and any requests for permission to publish, reproduce, distribute, display or make derivative works from any article, text, images or other material published by Swiss Medical Press should be directed to info@swissmedicalpress.com

 

Privacy Statement

The names and email addresses entered in this journal site will be used exclusively for the stated purposes of this journal and will not be made available for any other purpose or to any other party.

 

Author Fees

This journal charges the following author fees.

Article publication fee: 950.00 (EUR)

The publication of an article in JOC incurs a processing fee of EUR 950 per article (excl. VAT) of up to seven typeset pages (A4). For each additional typeset page a charge of EUR 50 is incurred. It is customary that the author's institution covers the publication costs for articles resulting from research undertaken at the institution, or that money has been earmarked in the grant or stipend that the author has received to be able to carry out the research.

Publication fees may be waived for authors from developing countries lacking sufficient research funding, according to the World Bank classification of low- and middle-income countries as of January 2016. Individual waiver requests will be considered on a case-by-case basis and may be granted in circumstances of lack of funds. The ability of authors to pay remains unknown to the Editors prior to possible acceptance. Commentaries and editorials do not incur an article publication fee